A few thoughts on handling online corrections, and the NYT’s memory hole.

Over at Bill Bishop’s new Sinocism blog, there’s a very interesting post and discussion about how the New York Times handles corrections to its online edition. The example in question concerns a switch in a China-related headline, from “Beijing Police Beat Artists Protesting Evictions” to “Evicted Artists Protest After Attack in Beijing,” once somebody at…

On money sloshing down the streets, and being misquoted by one of the world’s “premier” newspapers.

[UPDATE: I’ve received an email from an IHT editor assuring me that a correction is being prepared for online and print.] [UPDATE 2/26: The digital version of the story mentioned in this post has been corrected. Many thanks to the editors and writer who helped the process along. I appreciate it.] Late this afternoon I…

How Scary is the Daily Beast?

I’ve been facing the working journo’s version of a devil’s cocktail: multiple deadlines mixed with lots of travel. But despite my burdens, I was still able to take note of Daily Beast’s over-the-top effort to render recent diplomatic spats between the US and China into something … scary. Specifically,  a (re)package of stories that it…

If you write it, I.M Pei will come? Not exactly.

Earlier this week I was skimming my favorite state-owned Chinese newspapers when I came across this rather startling People’s Daily headline regarding I.M. Pei, the last of the great modernist architects: According to the article, the developer of the museum “has invested 50 million yuan to invite Pei to design the museum” and “[r]eporters also…

Depends on what the definition of ‘rescued’ is.

Depending upon whom you read, last night the Chinese bulk coal carrier that was hijacked by Somali pirates back in October was either a) ransomed for US$4 million yesterday, or b) “rescued” in an undisclosed operation. Representing option A, we have Shanghai Daily, which reprinted a foreign wire service story that it headlined “Somali pirates:…

Watch as the NYT mis-characterizes China’s Copenhagen negotiating position.

In today’s coverage of the Copenhagen impasse between China and the US, John Broder and James Kanter report: “I think there’s no doubt that China, when it says 40 to 45 percent reduction in energy intensity, is serious about that,” said Ed Miliband, the British secretary of state for energy and climate change. “The more…

What ‘New Era?’ Counter-factual Bush Fatigue, and other notes on the Press, Obama, and China.

If you’ve bothered to read, watch, or listen to the post-post-Obama-in-China commentary over the last forty-right hours, you’d be excused for thinking that the Presidential visit had just closed a tumultuous chapter in the history of Sino-US relations. And, in fact, that’s precisely how many observers – a good portion of them glad to have…

Media Note

A quick post to let US readers know that I’m scheduled to appear on Minnesota Public Radio’s Midmorning with Keri Miller on Tuesday at 10:45 AM, CST (that’s 12:45 AM, Wednesday, in China, for you night owls). We’ll discuss Obama and China, and my recent piece for the Atlantic exploring the reasons for his popularity…

“I’m a big supporter of non-censorship.”

This phrase, more than any other, personifies the disappointment that I’ve been reading online, and hearing in-person, from Chinese friends who watched the Obama Town Hall in Shanghai. It’s an awkward phrase, many miles from “I oppose censorship,” and really uncharacteristic of a President celebrated for his eloquence and his ability to inspire. It’s an…